What Are The Building Blocks of Proteins? The Chains

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what are the building blocks of proteins

Are you wondering what are the building blocks of proteins? If yes, then you just found the answer. Here, we discussed the building blocks and the Chains.

What are the building blocks of proteins?

The building block of a protein is called the amino acid. The term amino acid refers to any nitrogen containing organic compound.

Proteins are made of combinations of amino acids in varying amounts. Proteins are classified depending on how they get their structure.

Structurally proteins fall into two categories:

  1. Proteins that contain one polypeptide chain, such as hair and skin, are referred to as monomeric protein, and
  2. Proteins that are composed of polymers having two or more polypeptide chains such as hemoglobin, collagen, and ribosomes are referred to as multi-molecular protein.

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins

Resonating question: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

Like all proteins, the protein in your hair is made up of subunits called amino acids. There are 20 different types of amino acids that serve as building blocks of proteins, each with different size and chemical properties.

The type and order (or sequence) of amino acids in a protein determine its function and shape; therefore, the structure and function of a protein is ultimately determined by its amino acid sequence.

Basically there are 20 different amino acids that combine to form a functioning protein

Resonating question: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

Imagine you have a tray of Lego blocks, and in this tray there’s only one type of block: half-blocks. There are 20 different kinds of half-blocks: some are red, some are blue, some are green.

They’re all the same size and shape, but each color is unique.

Each Lego block is like an amino acid because they all fit into the same “mold,” but each one has something slightly different about it. This difference means that nearly every amino acid that exists can assemble in nearly every possible order to form a protein!

Each amino acid contributes a different side chain to the protein, which determines how that protein functions and interacts with other molecules

Resonating question: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

Each amino acid contributes a different side chain to the protein, which determines how that protein functions and interacts with other molecules.

These side chains range in size and shape from small, volatile molecules to bulky rings of carbon atoms. Because they differ so greatly, they determine how the protein will behave and what it can do.

For example, the side chains of one amino acid may be positively charged under certain circumstances. In this case, proteins containing that amino acid will be more likely to interact with negatively charged molecules like DNA or RNA.

Proteins composed of other amino acids will have different interactions based on their own side chains’ shapes and charges.

The basic structure of an amino acid consists of an amine group and a carboxyl group plus a third interesting part of the molecule called an R group

Resonating question: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

You may be asking, “What makes one amino acid different from the next?” Well, it’s all in the side chain or R group.

The R group is unique for each amino acid and can be as small as a hydrogen atom or as large as a complex ring structure.

The shape, size, and electrical charge of each R group determines the unique properties of that amino acid.

The R group’s function is to vary between amino acids, giving each one its own unique character and properties

Resonating question: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

The R group’s function is to vary between amino acids, giving each one its own unique character and properties.

The R group is the part that makes each amino acid different from the next; it determines the properties of the amino acid.

The organization of amino acids into proteins is very similar to that of monomers into polymers

Resonating question: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

In the same way that a polymer can be thought of as a long chain composed of monomer units, you can also think of proteins as chains formed by amino acids.

However, proteins are distinguished from polymers in the fact that proteins have more complex three-dimensional structures.

To illustrate this point, recall that the monomer unit in starch is glucose and the monomer unit in cellulose is also glucose but with a different arrangement of atoms.

The difference between these two polymers is based entirely on their arrangement. Similarly, every protein has a unique sequence of amino acids and arrangement of atoms as well.

One type of amino acid will be repeated many times in a long chain, just like one kind of monomer can form long polymer chains

Resonating question: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

There are 20 naturally occurring amino acids. They form when a carboxyl group from one amino acid reacts with an amino group from another amino acid forming a bond called peptide bond.

In this process, water is also formed, so the formation of one peptide bond between two amino acids involves losing one molecule of water (H2O). The resulting molecule is known as a dipeptide.

One type of amino acid will be repeated many times in a long chain, just like one kind of monomer can form long polymer chains.

If you change the sequence of amino acids you change the function of the protein that is formed.

Different proteins basically have different types and numbers of amino acids linked together to perform different functions in the body.

Some examples could be:

  • Hemoglobin,
  • Insulin and
  • Collagen.

Protein structure is essential for their function

Resonating question: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

Proteins are complex molecules that are the building blocks of all life. They are made up of amino acids, which is why they’re sometimes known as polypeptides.

In humans, proteins make up everything from our hair and skin to the enzymes in our blood. The structure of a protein is essential for its function, meaning that if a protein’s shape changes even slightly it may not work properly and can’t carry out its task in the cell.

That is it about “what are the building blocks of proteins?” Hope you have learnt something new and found the right answer to your questions: “what are the building blocks of proteins?”

If you have any question, please, drop it in the comments below and you will get a response soon. Thanks!

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